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2-Phase Immersion Cooling could help reducing catastrophic climate change


new report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a red-alarm wake-up call, for all of us. “Several hundred million” lives are at stake, threatened by super hurricanes and typhoons, heat waves, drought and flooding, reduction of food crops, poverty, and starvation.

 

The conclusion is clear: Regardless of what industry you work in, we all must do more to limit and hopefully reverse the undeniable damage being done to our planet. The IPCC’s strong recommendation is to have a low energy demand to reduce global warming to 1.5°C. Even a temperature rise of “1.5°C is much worse than the 1°C we’re experiencing now”. But we have only 12 years to achieve this goal and prevent devastating consequences.

 

I’m proud to run Allied Control Limited, a Bitfury subsidiary and a Hong Kong-based company that uses 2-phase immersion cooling technology to dramatically reduce the large amounts of energy being used to power datacenters around the world.

Immersion cooling technology is the next-generation sustainable solution for our digital world.

 

High-powered datacenters are increasingly used for everything from internet searches to artificial intelligence to securing the Bitcoin Blockchain, and it is crucial we make sure they are energy efficient, sustainable and productive. The Bitfury Group and Allied Control are working together to lead the way with our signature custom designed immersion cooling solution.

 

Data centers contain millions of computer chips. To effectively secure the Bitcoin Blockchain and supporting a future of much more energy-efficient financial transactions, these chips are used to solve complex cryptographic mathematical problems. As these chips run, they generate a significant amount of heat. In traditional data centers, resources are spent on air-conditioning systems that keep the chips cool, which can be expensive and use a lot of electricity, in many areas often generated by burning fossil fuels. Immersion cooling provides an environmentally responsible solution to today’s challenges.

Immersion-cooled data centers use far less electricity on air conditioning and cooling because computer chips are placed directly into a pool of 3M’s leading Novec fluids. These fluids are safe for computer chips and keep the chips cool as they run and generate heat. The fluid is evaporating and changing from liquid to vapor phase as the chips generate heat. When the Novec fluid evaporates, it rises to the top of the container, where it comes into contact with pipes containing cooled water.

 

Upon contact with the cooled pipes, the Novec vapor condenses and returns to the pool where it continues cooling the chips. This cutting-edge process is up to 4,000 times more efficient than traditional air cooling, and it is silent, non-toxic and environmentally friendly.

 

This proprietary immersion cooling solution is an incredible innovation that significantly reduces energy consumption and deployment time and delivers environmental sustainability. We’ve seen these effects in the datacenters we’ve built, which are the world’s largest and most efficient immersion cooling datacenters.

Our technology is award winning and the company has built many of the world’s largest immersion cooled datacenters. The company has won several awards for this work, including:

  • Best Green ICT Award – Hong Kong’s Most Energy Efficient Data Center
  • DatacenterDynamics Award – Future Thinking & Design Concepts
  • Green Innovations Award – Gold – Application of Immersion Cooling in Data Centers
  • Most Valuable Services Award (Hong Kong)

 

Next month, I’ll be in Dallas at SC18, the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis. There I hope to meet with others to discuss ways we can work together to address many of the challenges we face, including climate change. I invite you to our booth #1616 to see our multiple live demonstration systems donating processing time for cancer research.